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Statistics

Employer

In a 2012 Harris poll, 29% of people surveyed said they’d give up chocolate to telework. (5% said their spouse!) Here are some other facts you might want to know:

  • 79% of American workers would choose to work at home if given the opportunity  Telework Research Network – Workshifting Benefits Study
  • The total number of people who worked from home or remotely for an entire day at least once a month in 2010 was 26.2 million which represents 20% of the U.S. working adult population Telework 2011 A WorldatWork Special Report (page 3)
  • 45% of the US Workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least part-time telework. The State of Telework in the US June 2011

Fortune 100 Best Places to Work
1980′s – 3 Companies had telework programs
1999 -18 Companies had telework programs
As of 2013 – 84 Companies on the list have them!

For the most recent facts about telework visit Global Workplace Analytics. Other things you should know?:

  • Flexible Work Arrangements rank #2 in importance after compensation for people seeking new employment
  • Gen Y’ers are more difficult to recruit (as reported by 56% of hiring managers) and to retain (as reported by 64% of hiring managers) but they are particularly attracted flexible work arrangements. (The Edge Report, 2008 Robert Half International Survey)
  • Teleworkers have become one of the fastest growing employee groups in Corporate America as well as in many other parts of the world.
  • 50 Million US employees who want to work from home hold jobs that are telework compatible through only 2.9 million consider home their primary place of work (2.3% of the workforce) The State of Telework in the US June 2011
  • Regular telecommuting grew by 61% between 2005 and 2009.  During the same period, home based self employment grew by 1.7% The State of Telework in the US June 201
  • Based on current trends, with no growth acceleration, regular telecommuters will total 4.9 million by 2016, a 69% increase from the current level but well below other forecasts. The State of Telework in the US June 2011
  • 76% of telecommuters work for private sector companies, down from 81% in 2005- the difference is largely attributable to increased work at home among state and federal workers The State of Telework in the US June 2011
  • The typical telecommuter is a 49 year old, college educated, salaried, non-union employee in a management or professional role, earning $58,000 a year at a company with more than 100 employees. The State of Telework in the US June 2011
  • The total number of people who worked from home or remotely for an entire day at least once a month in 2010 was 26.2 million which represents 20% of the U.S. working adult population of 139 million (as of fourth quarter 2010) (BLS 2010) Telework 2011 A WorldatWork Special Report (page 3)
  • In 2010, 84% of teleworkers did so one day per week or more, up from 72% in 2008 Telework 2011 A WorldatWork Special Report (page4)
  • The option to telework regularly on a monthly basis is offered more often to salaried employees (97%) than to hourly employees (11%).  Non exempt employees historically have been managed based on time accounting and there are specific legal and regulatory requirements imbedded in that mgmt. system
  • Only 21% of employers train managers on how to implement and support flexible work arrangements, and only 17% train workers on how to be successful as an employee with a flexible work arrangement. Telework 2011 A WorldatWork Special Report (page 5)
  • 40% of U.S. employees hold jobs that that could be done at home (50 million).   (Matthews & Williams 2005—Telework Adoption and Energy Use in Buildings and Transport Sectors in the United States and Japan)

 

Employee

  • 38% of people who did not currently telecommute said they had job-related tasks that they thought they could perform from home. (WorldatWork Telework Trendlines 2009)
  • Less than 2% of U.S. employees work from home the majority of the time (not including the self-employed), but 40% hold jobs that are compatible with telecommuting. If those employees worked at home just half of the time (roughly the national average for those who do), as a nation we would:
      • Save consumers $15 billion at the pumps (based on $2.60/gallon)
      • Enable employees to gain back the equivalent of  2-3 weeks worth of vacation time per year—time they’d have otherwise spent commuting.
      • Save employees between $1,800 and $6,800 in transportation and work-related costs. In addition, some would also be able to cut daycare and eldercare costs. Many would also qualify for home office tax breaks.
      • Only 21% of employers train managers on how to implement and support flexible work arrangements, and only 17% train workers on how to be successful as an employee with a flexible work arrangement. Telework 2011 A WorldatWork Special Report (page 5)
  • Regular telecommuting grew by 61% between 2005 and 2009.  During the same period, home based self employment grew by 1.7% The State of Telework in the US June 2011
  • Based on the latest American Community Survey data, just over 2% of the U.S. employee workforce (2.8 million people, not including the self employed or unpaid volunteers) considers home their primary place of work. (telework research network)
  • Estimates of how many people telecommute and how often they do it vary widely. Based on all the research we’ve done, our estimate is that 20 to 30 million people currently work from home at least one day a week. 15 to 20 million are road warriors / mobile workers; 10 to 15 million are home businesses; 15 to 20 million work at home part time (with about half doing so 1-2 days a week; and about 3 million are based at home full time (including self-employed). . (telework research network)
  • The number of Americans who <>worked from home or remotely at least one day per month for their employer (“employee telecommuters”) increased from approximately 12.4 million in 2006 to 17.2 million in 2008. A 39% 2 year increase and 74% increase since 2005. (WorldatWork Telework Trendlines 2009)
  • Penn. State University researchers analyzed 46 studies on Telecommuting that included more than 12,000 employees and found, “Telecommuters reported that they were more satisfied with their jobs, were motivated to stay with the employer, experienced less stress, were able to balance work and family time better and got higher ratings from their bosses.”
  • Less than 1% of telecommuters want to stop once they have started to telecommute. (Nortel Networks)
  • On average, employees who worked only in the office reported struggling to balance work and family life after 38 hours of weekly work, whereas employees with flex-time and the ability to telecommute cranked out 57 hours of work before reporting a strain on work-life balance.

Community

  • The existing 2.9 million US telecommuters save 390 million gallons of gas and prevent the release of 3.6 million tons of greenhouse gases yearly.
  • If those with compatible jobs worked at home 2.4 days a week (the national average of those who do), the reduction in greenhouse gases (51 million tons) would be equivalent of taking the entire New York workforce off the roads.
  • The national savings would total over $900 billion a year; enough to reduce the Persion Gulf oil imports by 46%
  • The energy saved annually from telecommuting could exceed the output of all renewable energy sources combined.
  • In response to high gas prices, almost one in four employers are planning to offer a telecommuting option for their employees within the next six months (8/08) and 42% already have. (Mercer’s 2008 Gas Price Impact SnapShot™ Survey)
  • More frequent telecommuting has been the second highest way employees have dealt with rising fuel prices. It was cited by 33% of workers (46% had increased carpooling, 33% were driving more fuel efficient cars, and 30% are looking for job closer to home). (The Edge Report, 2008 Robert Half International Survey)
  • Less than 2% of U.S. employees work from home the majority of the time (not including the self-employed), but 40% hold jobs that are compatible with telecommuting. If those employees worked at home just half of the time (roughly the national average for those who do), as a nation we would:
  • save over 280 million barrels of oil (37% of Persian Gulf oil imports) valued at over $23 billion (based on $80/barrel)
  • reduce greenhouse gases by 53 million tons—the equivalent of taking almost 10 million cars off the road for a year—that’s over 21% of the nation’s goal for GHG reduction by 2020.
  • Reduce wear and tear on our highways by over 115 billion miles a year saving communities over a billion in highway maintenance.
  • Save almost 100,000 people from traffic-related injury or death. Accident-related costs would be reduced by almost $12 billion a year.
  • Save enough in office electricity to power more than 900,000 homes for a year.